NEW MILLS
Snippets
Snippets

 

Here i hope to record a few of the interesting snippets i have come across whilst researching for other things.
 

  • The Sett Valley was known as Goitre Valley, because of the high prevalence of Goitre, a condition also known as Derbyshire neck. The condition caused a swelling of the thyroid gland in the neck, sometimes the neck would swell to extreme size. Women would often wear ribbon to disguise their necks. A cure was not found until around the time of the First World War, when doctors realised that the swelling was caused by a lack of Iodine in the diet.

  •  1812 New Mills Old Prize Band was formed in 1812, by Timothy Beard, Choirmaster of the Brookbottom Methodist Chapel. Generations of the Beard family were prominent figures at New Mills Old Prize Band for over a century. 
     
  • New Mills Old Prize Band is acknowledged as the worlds oldest Brass Band
     
  • During the first World War the members of the band joined the Sherwood Forester and served in France as the Regimental Band. 
     
  • Sometime before 1900 Band Leader Stephen Beard composed a tune called "Ransom". It may have been a rearrangment of the methodist hymn 'Thou Shepherd of Israel, and Mine', by Charles Wesley. The popular tune was known and loved throughout the district and played on request at many gatherings. It became in many ways the anthem of the town. It is referred to as a lovely broad flowing melody that many of the towns people had known since childhood. " The opening hymn was traditional: Thou Shepherd and Israel and mine..... Charles Wesley's fervid, artfully artless verses were sung to a tune - an excellent tune called "Ransom" - composed two or three generations ago by an organist belonging to an old local family. It had a broad, flowing melody, and everybody in the crowded chapel had known it since childhood. They sang it now with a sureness of rhythm, with a pressure of enthusiasm that made the nerves tingle, that provided, in a volume of exultant sound, a few moments of unique experience."  from A Derbyshire Childhood 1897-1913, by James Philip Bowden.
     "Ransom"  by Stephen Beard

 

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  • Falco chrysaetos, Golden Eagle – Dark brown with ferruginous variatond; bill deep blue; cere and feet yellow; legs clothed down to the toes with yellow ferruginous feathers, tail blackish, with grey undulations at the base. Length three feet;extent of wings seven feet four inches; weight twelve pounds. The Golden Eagle is the largest and most majestic of all the falcon tribe. Its strength is such, that it can with ease carry a lamb, and several instances are recorded of its carrying off children. Mr Willoughby says, that in the year 1668, an eagles nest was found in the Woodlands, near the river Derwent, in the Peak of Derbyshire. He describes the nest as being composed of large sticks, one end resting on the edge of a rock, the other on two birch trees, and covered with several layers of rushes and heath.
    In this nest lay one young one and an addled egg, and by them a lamb, a hare, and three heath poults. The nest was about two yards square, and unlike the nests of other birds, quite flat. The young eagle was black, of the shape of a Goshawk, and almost the weight of a goose, rough footed, or feathered down to the foot, having a white ring about the tail.
    About the year 1720, one was taken up in the parish of Glossop, upon the high mountain called Kinder-scout. This was found in a feeble state, said to be owing to the inclemency of the weather, as it afterward recovered, and was carried about the country, and shown as a natural curiosity. About seventy years ago, an eagle was seen in Hardwick Park. A full grown golden eagle was shot between Cromford and Lea wood, about six years ago (1825), which answers in every respect the description given by Pennant and others. This noble bird was presented to Peter Arkwright, esq. Of Rock House, Cromford, who had it finely preserved

  • Kinder Printworks closed in October 1901.

  •  James Ingham one of the pioneers of Primitive Methodism in the district and one of the itinerant preachers at Bradwell, later settled in business at New Mills.

     
  • Electric lighting was first used in Wood Printworks on the 21st November1927.
 
  • Wood Printworks gave all employees a week’s notice on the 24th January 1940. Works closed down.
 
  • December 3rd 1925 saw ice-skating on Wood lodges Hayfield in one of the most severe winters in memory.
 
  • February 16th 1928, severe storms stopped Wood, Birch Vale, Watford, Strines and Furness Vale Printworks.
 
  • Hayfield War Memorial opened on the 2nd of October 1926.
 
  • Hayfield Picture House burned down, May 29th 1932.
 
  • A great blizzard raged from Wednesday January 26th to January 30th 1940. Many local roads closed, railway blocked with snow, works closed. Hayfield completely cut off.

  •  The first aeroplane passed over Hayfield on August 17th 1914.
     
 
  • Hayfield is known today a popular destination for ramblers, but in the heyday of the railway, the numbers arriving in the village can hardly be believed. On June 16th 1930, it was recorded by the Manchester Guardian that 1,800 hikers had arrived by train in Hayfield and some 3,000 hikers and campers had returned to town. It was reported that there were concerns from villagers of rowdiness, topless male sunbathing and singing ‘ to the banjo and the uke, which these young troubadours sling across their backs.’ In Hayfield, Good Fridays were acknowledged as the start of the rambling season. In the 1930’s and 40’s, it was not uncommon for up to 8,000 people to arrive by train.
 
  • On Friday 22nd January 1909 a foreman on the Stockport Corporation, waterworks saw flames burst from the engineer’s office. A number of men ran to the spot and smashed the door and windows, but the flames drove them back. All the contents including plans drawings and apparatus were destroyed in half an hour.
 
  • November 28th 1905. An inquest was held at Stockport into the death of Jabez Waterhouse who was fatally injured at Strines Printworks by an exploding hydro extractor. Mr Smith, a factory inspector said that several accidents of a similar nature had been investigated. He had come to the conclusion that people in Bleachworks, laundries and Printworks did not realise the great pressures caused by an unequal distribution of weight in hydro extractors. The hydro extractor was loaded with cloth and doing 600 revolutions a minute when it burst. Waterhouse received a fractured skull when struck by flying metal. Another man Albert Saxon was also injured. The cage containing the cloth had a velocity of one hundred and fifteen miles a minute. The unequal distribution of one pound (240grams) would set up a strain of three to four hundredweight (150 to 200kg approx) to the square inch (25mm), and that would be sufficient to burst the machine.
 
  • On April 1st 1931, prompt action saved the Hayfield Wesleyan Sunday School from destruction. Some boys noticed that the weatherboard at the gable end of the building was on fire and raised the alarm. The fire brigade were at first unable to obtain sufficient pressure to reach the flames, which were being fanned by a gale of wind. Mr Leonard Simpson, of Little Hayfield who was passing on his motor bicycle, although not a member of the brigade, pluckily ascended to the roof in the teeth of the gale by means of a ladder. The pressure of water was improved and Mr Simpson operating the hose within inches of the flames was able to extinguish the fire before it penetrated the roof. The fire was caused by sparks from a neighbouring chimney igniting the weatherboard
  • Saturday 26th March 1859 Samuel Wyatt of New Mills came by his death at the bottom of New Mills. He fell backwards off the bridge whose iron rails were in bad repair. (Salem Bridge?)
 
  • 18 of June 1872. A new bridge was put over the river Goyt at Goytside near New Mills, but was taken a way by the Great Flood.
 
  • 3rd February 1850. Benjamin Wild became the First man to be baptised in the River Goyt by the Later Day Saints.
 
  • October 1st 1852. 35 Donkeys walked in a procession in New Mills and a sheep was roasted to celebrate the two Toll Bars being taken down.
 
  • April 3 1858. The trial of Birch Vale Print Works.
 
  • June 16 1858. A very heavy flood at Hayfield, five houses were washed down.
 
  • Friday January 14th 1859.Accident at Kinder Vale Print Works three men killed.
 
  • January 5th 1860.Freak of nature. A cow belonging to Mr Thomas Bennett farmer of Thornset Fields gave birth to a calf with two heads, four eyes, three ears, two tails one body and four legs it lived twelve hours.

  • A severe cattle plaque, or " pestilence amongst the horned cattle," raged in England from 1745 to 1755. The distemper was supposed to have been introduced into England from Holland by means of two white cows, which a farmer at Poplar sent for to improve his breed.
    By October, 1745, it had spread thence into Surrey. Kent, Essex. Berkshire, and Bedfordshire; few of the farmers " saving more than one in five of the cattle that have been taken, but most having lost their whole stock."
    An Act was passed in February, 1745-6, authorising the Privy Council to take necessary measures for the abatement and suppression of the plague. On March 12th, 1746, the Privy Council ordered diseased beasts to be shot, and their skins destroyed: granting moderate compensation. But the disorder continued to rage in one part or other of the country for nearly ten years from the time of the first outbreak. It gradually passed northwards, and on January 15th 1746-7, it was ordered that no cattle should pass from the south across the Humber and Trent.
    In April, 1747, the plague had reached Derbyshire. By the beginning of September, it was estimated that 40,000 head of cattle had died in the three counties of Derby, Nottingham, and Lincoln.
    At the Epiph Sessions, 1748-9, inspectors of horned cattle were appointed for the county of Derby, to be paid at a rate not exceeding one shilling per day when on duty.
    Just a year later, the matter came again before the court, when the good effects of putting the laws for checking the distemper into force were demonstrated, and that where they had been disobeyed or laxly enforced, the evil had spread from herd to herd.
    It was established that the plague had been brought into the hundred of High Peak by carrying of hides, horns, hoofs, and bones of infected cattle through the county.
    Complaint was also made that various farmers had refused to kill their cattle, or to give proper notice of disease to the Inspectors. The justices, therefore, resolved to adopt more stringent precautions, and appointed all the several petty constables, overseers of poor, and churchwardens of the whole of the townships of the county of Derby inspectors under the Act, and they were enjoined to be very careful and diligent in the execution of their office.

    Specially qualified inspections were also appointed for Glossop and Chapel-en-le-Frith, who were to stop all carriage of horns, hides, etc, through the county.
    No fair nor market for any sort of horned cattle was to be held anywhere in Derbyshire until further order, and no horned cattle were to cross Swarkeston bridge or Wilne ford one way or the other.

    At the Trans. Sessions, 1750, Samuel Dury printer, was ordered to print three hundred copies of the Act of Parliament for prevention of distemper.

    At Mich. Sessions, 1751, fairs and markets for horned cattle were again prohibited throughout the county. Notice to this effect was ordered to be issued in the General Evening Post and in the Derby and Nottingham Mercuries, whilst other notices were to be distributed throughout Derbyshire by the clerk of the peace. A like order was made by the court at Easter, 1752.
    It was ordered, at the Epiph. Sessions, 1752-3 that the constable of Winshill have notice that he be very diligent in obliging people in his jurisdiction to bury their cattle that die in the infection, according to the King's order in Council. This is the last entry that I have noticed amongst the orders upon this subject.

    So grave did the situation become that in 1748, the following prayer was ordered to be used in the churches of England and Wales " every day, on occasion of the present mortality among the cattle":-

    " O gracious God, who, in Thy great Bounty to Mankind, hast given them the Beasts of the Field for their Provision and Nourishment continue to us, we humbly beseech thee, this Blessing, and suffer us not to be reduced to Scarcity and Distress by the contagious Distemper, which has raged, and still rages, among the Cattle in may parts of this Kingdom. In this and all other thy Dispensations towards us, we see and adore the Justice of thy Providence and do with sorrowful and penitent hearts confess, that our manifold Vices and Impieties have deservedly provoked thine anger and Indignation against us. But we earnestly entreat Thee, Almighty Father, in this our calamitous State, to look down upon us with an Eye of Pity and Compassion; and, if it be Thy blessed will, to forbid the spreading of this sore Visitation, and, in Thy good time to remove it from all the Inhabitants of this Land, for the sake of thy mercies in Christ Jesus our only Saviour and Redeemer. Amen."
 
  • Friday January 13th 1860. Explosion. A terrible explosion occurred on Friday night at the Kinder Print Works at about half past ten one of the Bleaching Kiers blew up with a tremendous explosion. The top of the kin was forcing up through the roof of the building and fell on the roof of the adjoining building, crashing through it onto a drying machine on the second floor, smashing it to pieces, forcing it through the floor into the ground floor of the bleaching croft. No lives were lost though one lad was severely scalded, and another lad and the foreman bleacher Mr Thomas Gorse, were slightly injured. The cause of the explosion is not known.
 
  • Friday Night September 7th 1860.An accident of a most alarming nature took place at the Gnat Hole Bugsworth it appears that a man named Moses Plant was replenishing his flask with Gun Powder and whilst thus engaged a lighted candle most unfortunately got upset. A spark got into the flask and the Powder immediately took fire and so tremendous was the explosion that it actually burst through the chamber floor knocking several slates from the top of the house, blowing out the windows, and causing much damage. Plant,his wife and child were the only persons in the house and it is most surprising they escaped with their lives all three were immediately conveyed to the Union Workhouse at Chapel en-le Frith where every attention was rendered them.
 
  • Thursday November 1st 1860.Hayfield and New Mills Junction Railway. The first clods of the projected railway between New Mills and Hayfield were ceremoniously dug at New Mills.
 
  • 1801 Edward Bower of New Mills in the parish of Glossop/cotton manufacturer was convicted of arson on own (Salem) mill in an attempt to defraud the Royal Exchange Assurance Company. He was sentenced to 12 months in Derby Gaol.
 
  • Anthony Lingard murdered Hannah Oliver age 48. Widow. She was the keeper of the toll booth at Wardlow Mires. He was executed on the 8th March 1815. His body was removed to Wardlow where the crime took place and his body hung in gibbet. This was the last gibbeting in the County of Derby.
 
  • 1816 Peter Bradbury, age 45 was convicted of the murder of his 4 children with arsenic at New Mills.
 
  • 1818 George Brocklehurst, age 35. Convicted of sheep stealing at Hayfield. Sentenced to death, sentence remitted to life imprisonment. On October 16th 1820, his sentence was mitigated to 14 yrs. In 1825, he was imprisoned aboard the hulk "Retribution" at Sheerness. Reported to be in good health and of orderly behaviour. Granted a free pardon on the 10th May, 1825.
 
  • Hulks were mostly out of date or redundant Naval ships. They were moored and stripped of armament, gun ports were sealed and the ship then used as a floating prison containing several hundred men and boys. Many men were transported to the colonies direct from these prison hulks. Ships lined with soldiers drawing along side the hulk and taking on prisoners, before sailing for Australia or other colonies. Few of these prisoners ever returned.
 
  • 1824 Joseph Beaumont. Convicted of stealing a sovereign at New Mills.
 
  • 1824 Anthony Ward. Tried for an assault on John Mellor at Beard found not guilty.
 
  • April 1826. Joseph Green, age 21. Convicted at Chester Assizes of stealing cheese sentenced to 7yrs transportation. In 1829, he was imprisoned aboard the hulk "Ganymede". Whilst aboard he earned 5 pounds 2s. He was transported to Van Diemens Land aboard the ship "Georgiana" whilst aboard he was punished for robbing hold of tea & sugar-2 dozen strokes. A native of New Mills, Joseph was a navvy by trade. 5'5"heigh. Unmarried, Protestant.
 
  • 1831 Robert Taylor 27 uttering counterfeit coin Chapel en le Frith & Hayfield 1 year hard labour & sureties
    1831 Henry Clapham 22 uttering counterfeit coin Chapel en le Frith & Hayfield 1 year hard labour & sureties
    1831 Edward Neale 28 uttering counterfeit coin Chapel en le Frith & Hayfield 1 year hard labour & sureties
    1831 John Jones 30 uttering counterfeit coin Chapel en le Frith & Hayfield 1 year hard labour & sureties
    1831 Robert Parkinson 31 uttering counterfeit coin Chapel en le Frith & Hayfield 1 year hard labour & sureties.
 
  • 1831 James Horrocks age 30. Larceny. Arrested for stealing a pair of stockings and other items at Beard. Sentenced to 1 month’s hard labour.
 
  • 1832 John Bailey age 30 convicted of housebreaking and stealing a silver watch at Whitle. Sentenced to death then life transportation. Born Stockport, married with one child. A rope maker by trade. Described as having 5'5"tall, brown hair, grey eyes, tattoos-anchor on left hand, cross with small circlesabove, able to read. John was sent to the hulk "Cumberland" at Chatham. On 30 April 1833, he boarded the ship "Heroine for New South Wales. Granted his ticket of leave on 8 September 1843 at Windsor but was cancelled for absence from district on 12 August 1850. Restored 12 November 1850. He was granted a conditional pardon 3 August 1852.
 
  • 1834 Hesketh Shufflebottom age 26. Larceny. Arrested for stealing woollen cloth at Whitle. Sentenced to 2 months hard labour.

  • 1834 Thomas Fletcher 38. Larceny. Convicted of stealing woollen cloth at Whitle. Sentenced to 2 months hard labour
 
  • 1834 James Garside age 25. Larceny. Arrested for stealing a spindle box at Whitle. Sentenced to 18 months at the Lent Assizes. In April 1834, James Garside was removed from Derby Gaol to Chester and tried for the murder of Thomas Ashton in 1831.
 
  • 1834 Abraham Ashworth of New Mills arrested for putting wife in fear. Discharged.
 
  • 1834 Robert Shaw, age 34. Arrested for assault on Jacob Unwin Beard Ollersett. Discharged.
 
  • March 17th 1835. Robert Stafford age 48. Convicted of sheep stealing at Whitle. Sentenced to life transportation.Robert was received from Derby Gaol to the hulk "Justitia" at Woolwich on 30 March 1835. Transported to New South Wales on 27 August 1835 aboard the ship John Barry". Received his ticket of leave of Campbelltown on March 15th 1844 and a conditional pardon in August 1847. He died in 1854 at Yass, New South Wales.
 
  • March 14th 1836. Matthew Bowler aged 29. Larceny. Arrested for stealing a shirt at New Mills. Sentenced to 6 months jail. Spent the last month solitary.
 
  • January 2nd 1838. Edward Hobson aged 48. Larceny. Arrested for stealing timber at Hayfield. Sentenced to 1 month’s hard labour.
 
  • January 2nd 1838 Elizabeth Ibbotson aged 44. Larceny. Arrested for stealing 15 geese at Thornsett. Sentence unknown.
 
  • All four men were charged with offences relating to the Toll Bars. Local feeling against the Tolls was extreme and on several occasions erupted into violence and rioting.
  • January 2nd 1838 John Hulton, age 17. Riot and assault on a peace officers at Whitle discharged.
  • January 2nd 1838 Henry Potts age 21. Riot and assault on a peace officer at Whitle discharged.
  • January 2nd 1838 Thomas Quin age 18. Riot and assault on a peace officer at Whitle discharged. Later became a soldier.
  • January 2nd 1838 George Manifold age 14. Riot and assault on a peace officer at Whitle discharged.
 
  • A riot and assault on John Booth, James Booth and Joshua Partington whilst in the execution of their duty as Special Constables. All found guilty, but their sentences were respited. Apparently, they escaped punishment by naming the ringleaders.

  •  April 3rd 1838 Joseph Cooper, age 27. Arrested for rioting and destroying turnpike gate at New Mills. Found not guilty.

     
  • April 3rd 1838 Joseph Holmes, age 14. Arrested for rioting and destroying turnpike gate at New Mills. Found not guilty.
  • April 3rd 1838 John Wood, age 34. Arrested for rioting and destroying turnpike gate at New Mills. Found not guilty.
  • April 3rd1838, William Greatorex, age 24. Arrested for rioting and destroying a toll house at New Mills. Found not guilty.

  • It appears that Cooper walked the town ringing a bell and gathering a large crowd of two to three hundred persons who then converged on several toll houses before tearing down the turnpike gate at Salem. Following the trial and the jury’s verdict of not guilty the chairman of the court warned ‘ you have had a very narrow escape, and I trust you will take care not to appear here any more on such a charge. You may not again meet with such a jury who may take the same view of the case. Again I warn you from engaging in such lawless and disgraceful outrages.’

  • January 5th 1841, Margaret Hannah, age 32. Larceny. Arrested for stealing a pair of shoes at Whitle. Sentenced to 2 months hard labour.

  • January 5th 1841. Mark Rangely, age 23. Larceny. Arrested for stealing fowl at Hayfield. Found not guilty.

  • January 5th 1841. John Parker age 28. Larceny. Arrested for stealing fowl at Hayfield. Found not guilty.
  • January 5th 1841. Thomas Bowden age 21. Larceny. Arrested for stealing fowl at Hayfield. Found not guilty.
     
  • July 26th 1841. Thomas Simpson, age 27. Arrested for housebreaking and stealing a coat, waistcoat, two handkerchiefs and one pair of stockings at Thornsett. Sentenced to 12 months in prison. The first and last week were spent in solitary.

  • October 19th 1841.Thomas Holt, age 28 of New Mills. Curtilage breaking (probably refers to entering a yard) and stealing 30 hat bodies, one pair of shoes and one pair of stockings at Glossop. Sentenced to 1 year in jail.

     
  • January 4th 1842. John Higginbottom, age 25. Arrested for sheep stealing at Beard. Outcome unknown.

  • June 28th 1842. Jacob Unwin, age 33. Larceny. Arrested for stealing coal at Beard. Sentenced to 3 months hard labour.

  • June 27th 1843. William Green, age 28, of Beard Ollersett. Larceny. Arrested for stealing ten pigeons. Sentenced to nine months hard labour.

  • December 20th 1843. John Howe, age 14. Arrested for attempting to set fire to a cotton mill at Beard & Ollersett. Sentenced to fifteen months hard labour. John was granted a free pardon in September the following year.

  • July 29th 1845. James Hanson, age 37. Larceny. Arrested for stealing a vice and chisel at New Mills. Sentenced to 3 months jail.

  • March 17th 1845. Ann Cooper, age 18. Larceny. Employed in a dwelling house (maid?). Arrested for stealing money from her master John Higginbottom at New Mills. Sentenced to 8 months jail.

  • April 8th 1845. Joseph Simpson, aged 15. Larceny. Employed as a servant. Arrested for stealing brass castings at Beard and Ollersett. Sentenced to 1 month’s hard labour.

  • June 30th 1846. William Keeling, aged 42. Larceny Accused of stealing a hat at Hayfield. Found not guilty.

  • March 16 1847. John Ashton aged 18. Larceny arrested for stealing 6 stonemason's chisels at Beard and Ollersett. Sentenced to 3 months jail.

  • July 3rd 1849. Henry Jepson. Accused of fraud from the New Mills Burial Club, found not guilty.

  • 16th March 1849. James Rodson aka Robson, age 30. Arrested for forging request for delivery of goods at Hayfield. Sentenced to 4 months.

  • 14th October 1851. Samuel Brown, aged 27. Larceny. Arrested for stealing a pair of stockings at New Mills. Sentenced to 6 months hard labour.

  • 18th October 1853. John Ormston of New Mills. Larceny. Arrested for stealing brass. Sentenced to 3 months jail.
     

  • 27th June1854. Charles Buller, aged 38. Arrested for stealing from a dwelling four silk handkerchiefs, an overcoat and money at New Mills. Sentenced to 10 months jail.

  • 17th October 1854. Maria Mason of Hayfield. Larceny. Arrested for stealing 40yds of calico print from her master John Wright. Sentenced to 3 months prison.

  • 2nd January 1855. Abraham Hadfield. Larceny. Arrested for stealing a victorine at New Mills. Outcome unknown.

  • 20th March 1855. Bridget Rohan, aged 21. Larceny. Arrested for stealing a brush at New Mills. Sentenced to 2 months.

  • 1st January 1856. Ann Hinds, age 43. Larceny. Arrested for stealing a pair of boots at Whitle. Sentenced to 6 months.

  • 23rd July 1856.William Moorhouse, age 40. Brickmaker. Larceny. Committed sacrilege at St George church New Mills. Sentenced to 4 years. In 1858, he was held at Chatham Dockyard prison. He used the alias Baxter.

  •  13th March 1858. Thomas Stanway. Larceny. Arrested for stealing fowls at Rowarth. Sentenced to 6 months.


 

  • 29th June 1858. John Cowfield, aka Schofield, aged 50. Tailor. Larceny. Arrested for stealing £ 3.17s at New Mills. Sentenced to twelve months hard labour.

  • 4th January 1859. Joseph Hibbert, aged 41. Calico printer. Larceny. Arrested for robbing the New Mills Oddfellows Lodge. Sentenced to twelve months hard labour.

  • 15th October 1861. Francis Millward, aged 18. Labourer. Larceny. Arrested for stealing a watch at New Mills. Sentenced to three months hard labour.

  •  1st January 1861. Hannah Mason, aged 50. Housekeeper. Larceny by servant. Arrested for stealing silver nutcrackers, a silver candlestick and a Turkish coin at Hayfield. Sentenced to 9 months hard labour.
     
  • 1st January 1861. Catherine Parrott, aged 19. Servant. Larceny by servant. Arrested for stealing silver nutcrackers, a silver candlestick and a Turkish coin at Hayfield. Found not guilty.

  • 14th October 1862. George Sharpley, aged 51. Labourer. Larceny. Arrested for stealing 4 lbs of bread at New Mills. Sentenced to 4 years jail.

  • 29th July 1863. John Ridgway, aged 29. Mill hand. Larceny. Arrested for stealing a silver watch at Hayfield. Sentenced to 4 months hard labour.
  • 29th July 1863. Mary Ridgway 36. Mill hand. Arrested for receiving a stolen watch Hayfield. Sentenced to 3 months hard labour.

  • 16th July 1864. James Runcorn, aged 32. Mill hand. Arrested for uttering counterfeit coin at Hayfield. Sentenced to 4 years penal servitude. In 1865, he was transferred to Portland Gaol from Leicester Gaol.

  • 6th March 1866. Thomas Marton, whilst on bail committed an assault with intent to commit rape on Jeanette Marshal at New Mills. Sentenced to 6 months jail.

  • 18th July 1867. William Markland aged 17. Farm servant. Obtaining money under false pretences at New Mills. Sentenced to 6 months hard labour.

  • 6th December 1867. James Harker, aged 22. Block printer. Larceny Arrested for stealing counterpane at New Mills. Sentenced to 2 months jail.

  • 30th June 1868. William Skerritt, aged 39. Tailor. Larceny. Accused of stealing nails at New Mills. Found not guilty.

  • January 1869. George Henry Townley, aged 43. Factory hand. Arrested for stealing a sovereign and 7shillings and 6 pence at Hayfield. Sentenced to 3 months hard labour.

  • January 1869. Robert Stafford, aged 46. Block printer. Accused of stealing a basket of beef and mutton at New Mills. Found not guilty.

  • October 1869. Jabez William Wardle, aged 57. Labourer. Arrested for stealing a woollen shirt and handkerchief at New Mills. Sentenced to three months hard labour.

  • October 1870. William Lingard, aged 39. Labourer. Arrested for stealing a scythe at New Mills. Sentenced to four months.

  • 25th March 1872. George Mellor. Mason. Arrested for stealing 3 hammers and a shovel at New Mills. Sentenced to one month’s hard labour.

  • October 1873. James Hayne Hughes. Arrested for stealing a suit of clothes at New Mills. Sentenced to three months hard labour.

  • March 1877. Nathaniel Crankshaw. Arrested for the killing of Jesse Gee at Thornsett. Released on bail. Acquitted. 

  • April 1878. Robert Mason, age 17. Stonemason. Arrested for the rape of Emma Florey, age 15 yrs at New Mills. Sentenced to five years penal servitude.

  • April 1878. Charles Bradbury, aged 16. Moulder. Arrested for the rape of Emma Florey, age 15 yrs at New Mills. Sentenced to five years penal servitude.

  • April 1880. Absalom Placey, age 44. Slater. Arrested for stealing a tea kettle, three taps and a brass tap plug and other items at New Mills. Sentenced to four months hard labour.

  • November 1882. Michael McDermott aka Charles Smith, aged 24. Dealer. Arrested for rape at New Mills. Sentenced to twelve years penal servitude.

  • November 1882. James McDonald, age 52. Cotton spinner. Arrested for the rape of Alice Howe age 7 yrs at New Mills. Sentenced to twelve years penal servitude.

  • February 1887. John Bartlett aka Edwards, age 37. Hawker. Arrested for stealing tea chest, 50lbs of tea and an overcoat from the Midland Railway Company at New Mills. Sentenced to five years penal servitude

 

  • November 1887. William Burke, age 46. Labourer. Larceny. Arrested for stealing a silver watch and two knives at New Mills. Sentenced to nine months hard labour.

  • November 1887. William Burke, junior. Aged 17. Factory hand. Larceny. Arrested for stealing a silver watch and two knives at New Mills. Sentenced to twelve months hard labour.

  • November 1887. Thomas Burke. Aged 58.Labourer. Larceny. Arrested for stealing a silver watch and two knives at New Mills. Sentenced to nine months hard labour.

  • March 1889. John Moss Owen, age 56. Dealer. Arrested for stealing a box and other articles at New Mills. Sentenced to five years penal servitude.

  • July 1889. John Herald, aged 30. Fitter. Arrested for an assault on Hannah Beaumont, age 8 yrs at New Mills. Sentenced to six month’s hard labour.

  • July 1889. Samuel Holt, aged 23. Joiner. Arrested for an assault on Annie Toovey, age 14, at New Mills. Sentenced to nine months hard labour. 
  •  
     
    • October 1889. Michael Killan, aged 28. Labourer. Arrested for stealing £3.8s.2d at Thornsett. Sentenced to four months hard labour.
    • October 1889. Patrick Killan. Labourer.Arrested for stealing £3.8s.2d at Thornsett. Sentenced to two months hard labour.

    • February 1894. George Wood, aged 36. Labourer. Arrested for wounding John Turner at Ravensleach Quarry, Birch Vale. Sentenced to five years penal servitude.

    • October 1899. John BRUNT 45. Labourer. Arrested for malicious damage to windows at New Mills. Sentenced to nine months hard labour.

    • December 1899. George Swann, aged 21. Spinner. Arrested for the robbery of Joseph Bennett of Ashenclough, nr Glossop. Burglary stole a tankard, half dozen knives & forks, one ring, one tippet, two dresses and other articles. Swann described as follows –unmarried, can read, dark brown hair, fair complexion, dark grey eyes, blue comma mark above left wrist, slight scars left cheek. Sentenced to life transportation. Arrived Millbank gaol from Derby gaol sent to ship "David Malcom" for transportation to Norfolk Island. Eventually granted conditional pardon.  



    INQUESTS 
    James Potts, a cotton spinner at New Mills. Became caught in machinery at factory. Verdict - Accidental death September 1834
     
    Isaac Jepson, age 8 of Whitle. Found in reservoir. Verdict - found drowned November 1832
     
    Hannah Marsland, age 4. Died at Hayfield from burns. Verdict - Accidental death December 1834.
     
    Agnes Chatterton wife of John Chatterton, a weaver of Hayfield, cut her own throat. Verdict – suicide during insanity June 1836.
     
     
    INSOLVENTS - BANKRUPTS
     
    Edward Bower a cotton spinner (Salem Mill) of New Mills. Imprisoned Derby Gaol for arson and fraud. Insolvency hearing took place at the Star Inn Manchester on the 17th and 18th March 1802.
     
    23 February 1802
    Whereas a Commission of Bankrupt is awarded and
    issued forth against Edward Bower, late of New-
    Mills, in the County of Derby, but now a Prisoner in His
    Majesty's Goal in and for the said County, Cotton-Spinner,
    Dealer and Chapman, and he being declared a Bankrupt is
    hereby required to surrender himself to the Commissioners in
    the said Commission named, or the major Part of them, on
    the 17th and 18th Days of March next, at the Star Inn, in
    Manchester, in the County of Lancaster, and on the 10th of
    April following, at His Majesty's Goal at Derby, in and for
    the said County of Derby, at Eleven of the dock in the
    Forenoon on each of the said Days, and make a full Discovery
    and Disclosure of his Estate and Effects; when
    and where the Creditors are to come prepared to prove
    their Debts, and" at the Second Sitting to chose Assignee,
    and at the Last Sitting the said Bankrupt is required,
    to finish his Examination, and the Creditors are to assent to
    or dissent from the Allowance of his Certificate. All Persons
    indebted to the said Bankrupt, or that have any of
    his Effects, are not to pay or deliver the fame but to whom
    the Commissioners shall appoint, but give Notice to Messrs.
    Duckworth and Chippendall, Attorneys at Law, in Manchester
    aforesaid.
     
     
    John Bate, cotton spinner (Bate Mill) of Thornsett - Derby Gaol 1812
     
    James Boulton, publican & cotton spinner (Little Mill) Rowarth 15th February 1823
     
    Abner Rangeley, cotton spinner Hayfield cotton spinner 28th January 1826
     
    John Shepley, cotton manufacturer of Hayfield bankrupt. 17th March 1829.
     
    Robert Birch, cotton spinner of Great Longstone & New Mills/Angel Inn Chesterfield 28 July, 15 August, 16 August, 9 September 1831.
     
    Benjamin Wild, cotton spinner of Charlesworth, bankrupt. 14th March 1834.


    George Wild, cotton spinner of Rowarth bankrupt. 9th November 1838.
     
    John Shallcross, clogmaker New Mills/Derby County Court .1st April 1844.
     
    John Heartwell, bleacher (Ringstones) Rowarth Glossop/Derby Court House 1847. Dividend to creditors one shilling in the pound 1849
     
    Samuel Line, grocer & provisions dealer Hayfield Glossop. Derby Gaol 1850
     
    John Higginbottom, out of business New Mills - Derby County Court 17th March 1855
     
    Thomas Mason, cotton spinner New Mills - hearing Nottingham 20 July 1858
     
    James Beard, cotton spinner New Mills. Hearing held at Chapel-en-le Frith 28 March 1862
     
    Henry Bardsley, cotton spinner of Ludworth hearing Manchester 8 September 1862
     
    James Higginbottom. Paper maker, rag and waste dealer New Mills. Bankrupt 24th September 1862. Hearing held at Manchester on 7th Oct 1862. Bankruptcy annulled 27th May 1863.
     
    Whereas a Commission of Bankrupt is awarded and
    issued forth against Joshua Hague, of New-Mills,
    in the County of Derby, Cotton-Spinner, Dealer and Chapman,
    and. he being declared a Bankrupt is hereby required
    to surrender himself to the Commissioners in this said Commission
    named, or the major Part of them, on the 30th Day
    of September.
     
    May 1809
    Whereas the acting Commissioners in a Commission
    of Bankrupt awarded and issued against John Rusby,
    of New-Mills, in the County of Derby, Cotton-Spinner,
    Dealer and Chapman.
     
    1814
    Alexander Hunt, -formerly of Bugsworth mills, in the parish
    of Glossop, in the county of Derby, and late of Heaton
    Norris, in the parish of Manchester, in the county of Lancaster,
    Cotton-manufacturer.
     
    September 1814.
    Notice is hereby given, that the Partnership lately subsisting
    between Richard Broom, of Whitle-House, in
    the Parish of Glossop, and County of Derby, and Thomas
    Barker, of New-Mills, in the County of Derby, carried on
    at Woodley, in the Township of Bradbury, in the Parish of
    Stockport and County of- Chester, as Colliers, is 'this day dissolved
    bymutual consent.
     
    1819
    Whereas a Commission of Bankrupt is awarded and
    issued forth against Thomas Perkins, of Manchester,
    in the County of Lancaster, and Samuel Armstrong, of New
    Mills, in the County of Derby, Cotton-Spinners, Dealers,
    Chapmen, and Copartners, and they being declared Bankrupts                       
    are hereby required to render themselves to the Commissioners.
     
    1820
    Whereas the acting Commissioners in the Commission
    of Bankrupt awarded and issued against Thomas Perkins,
    of Manchester, in the County of Lancaster,
    and 'Samuel Armstrong, of New-Mills, in the County of
    Derby, Cotton-Spinners, Dealers, Chapmen, and Copartners.
     
    1825
    Whereas the acting Commissioners in the Commission
    of Bankrupt awarded and issued forth against
    Timothy Smith, late of Heaton-Norris, in the County of Lancaster,
    and James Yates, of New Mills, in the County of
    Derby, Brass and Iron-Founders, Dealers, Chapmen, and
    Copartners (carrying on business at Heaton Morris aforesaid,
    under the name or firm of 'Timothy Smith and Company).
     
    1823
    Notice is hereby given, that the Partnership carrying on
    by us the undersigned, at New Mills, in the County of,
    Derby, as Cotton-Spinners, under the firm of Thomas Crossley
    and Company, will be dissolved on the 9th day of February
    1827, by effluxion of time. All debts due to and owing from'
    the said Copartnership will be received and paid by the said
    Thomas Crossley. Given under our hands this 17th day of
    January 1827.
     Thomas Crossley.
    Samuel Armstrong.
    . . Thos. C. Hewes.
     
    1829
    Whereas a Commission of Bankrupt is awarded and
    issued forth against William Hunt, late of Stockport,
    in the County of Chester, but now of New-Mills, in the Parish
    of Glossop, in the County of Derby, Cotton Manufacturer,
    Dealer and Chapman, and he being declared a Bankrupt is
    hereby required to surrender himself to the Commissioners.
     
    1831
    Whereas a Commission of Bankrupt is awarded and
    issued forth against Thomas Oldham, of Manchester,
    in the County of Lancaster, and of Garrison, near New Mills,
    in the County of Derby, Calico-Printer, Dealer and Chapman,
    and he being declared a Bankrupt is hereby required
    to surrender himself to the Commissioners.
     
    Notice is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore
    subsisting between William Ward and Robert Thatcher,
    carrying on business as Cotton-Spinners, at New Mills, in
    the County .of Derby, under the firm of Ward and Thatcher,
    was this day dissolved by mutual consent: As witnesses
    our hands this 26th day of August 1831.
    William Ward.
    Robt. Thatcher.
     
    1832
    NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore
    existing and carried on between us the undersigned,
    under the firm of Samuel Schofield and Sons, and Robert and
    John Schofield, as Cotton-Spinners, at New Mills, near Stockport,
    is this day dissolved by mutual consent. Dated this 7th
    day of August 1832.
    Robert Schofield.
    John Schofield.
    Saml. Schofield.
     
    1833
    THE Creditors who have proved their debts under a
    Commission of Bankruptcy awarded and issued forth
    against Thomas Oldham, of Manchester, in the County of Lancaster,
    and of Garrison, near New Mills, in the County of
    Derby, Calico Printer, Dealer and Chapman, are requested
    to meet the Assignees of the estate and effects of the said
    Bankrupt, on Monday the 8th day of February next,
    at Eleven o'clock in the Forenoon precisely, at the Office
    of Messrs. Walker and Jesse, Solicitors, in Princess-Street, in
    Manchester aforesaid, in order to assent to or dissent from
    the said Assignees commencing and prosecuting such suit or
    suits at law or in equity, or adopting such other measures as
    may be deemed -requisite and necessary, for compelling certain
    persons, -to be named at such meeting, to carry into effect a
    certain agreement for a lease of certain erections, buildings,
    printworks, and premises, situate at Torr, near New Mills
    aforesaid, late in the occupation of John Edge, deceased, and
    belonging to the said Thomas Oldham, or his said Assignees,
    and to accept, take, and execute a lease thereof, upon such
    terms and conditions, and subject to such rent, covenants,
    and agreements, as will be then and there stated; and on other
    special affairs.
     
    March 1838
    Obadiah Stafford, formerly of the Lane-side, and late of New
    Mills, Derbyshire, Cotton-Spinner and Labourer, and one
    of the Executors of Daniel Stafford the elder, of Warksmoor-Torr,
    within Disley, Cheshire, Yeoman, deceased.
     
    John Pearson, of Beard Hall, near New Mills, Glossop, Derbyshire,
    formerly Tanner, and late in no business, and one
    of the Executors of' S Pearson, of the Lane-side, near
    Beard Hall aforesaid, Farmer, deceased.
     
    Whereas the Commissioners Acting in the prosecution.
    of a Fiat in Bankruptcy awarded and issued forth
    against Robert Thatcher and William Thatcher, of New Mills,
    in the county of Derby, Cotton-Spinners, Candlewick-Maker,
    Dealers, Chapmen, and Copartners. 
      
    1839
    Whereas a Fiat in Bankruptcy is awarded and issued
    forth against John Potts, of New Mills, in the county
    of Derby, Engraver to Calico-Printers, Dealer and
    Chapman, and he being: declared a bankrupt is hereby
    required to surrender himself to the Commissioners.
     
    1840
    John Garrett, late of New Mills, Derbyshire, Dealer in Tea
    and Coffee, and Schoolmaster, previously of New-buildings,
    Manchester, in no business, formerly of Stockport, Cheshire,
    shop man to a tea-dealer, also of New Mills aforesaid,
    Wesleyan Itinerant Preacher, and before that time of Bradford,
    Yorkshire, in no business.
     
    Sept 1840
    Freehold Land and excellent Engraving-mills, Dye-house, and
    cottages, at New Mills, in Derbyshire.
    To he peremptorily sold by auction, by Mr. T. M. Fisher,
    before James Whitehead, of Oldham, Gentleman, by order
    of the major part of the Commissioners named and authorised
    in and by a Fiat in Bankruptcy awarded and issued and now
    in prosecution against John Potts', of New Mills, in the county
    of Derby, Engraver to Calico Printers, Dealer and Chapman,
    at the house of Mr. Thomas Jackson, the Crown Inn, at New
    Mills aforesaid, on Wednesday t h e 30th day of September 1840,
    at six o'clock in the evening, subject to such conditions of sale
    as will be then and there produced.
    All those three several closes of land with their appurtenances,
    late of Handle Taylor, situate in Ollersett, in New Mills aforesaid,
    heretofore occupied as one close, and called the Croft at
    the back of the Ham, but now divided into and occupied as three
    closes, and called the Nearer Long Meadow, the Middle
    Long; Meadow, and the Further Long Meadow, containing in
    the whole by estimation ?? acres of land, statute measure,
    or thereabouts, be the same more or less, and all such estate
    and interest as the said Handle Taylor Heretofore had of, in,
    and to a certain 'rivulet, called the Marsh Brook, which runs
    and flows along the southerly side of the said several closes or
    parcels of land before particularly described; and also of, in,
    and to the land or ground over which the same rivulet runs
    and flows, so far as the same extends, runs, and flows along the
    sine of the said several closes or parcels of land;
    And also all that erection, building', or engraving shop.''
    with the painting gallery, boiler and engine-house, smithy, and other
    outbuildings thereto belonging, and now or late in the
    possession or occupation of the said John Potts, his assigns, or
    under tenants.
    And all those three several cottages or dwelling-houses,
    With the stable, coach-house, and shippon under the same,
    or late in several occupations of Mr. Knight, Joseph Cheetham,
    and Joseph Bower;
    And also all that erection and building intended to be used<'
    as a pottery manufactory, warehouse or shop, with the ovens
    and other outbuildings thereto-belonging, all which said erections
    and buildings are now standing and being upon the said
    several closes or parcels of land, or upon some part or parts- "
    thereof, respectively, together with the several fixtures, articles,
    and things thereto belonging and attached, consisting amongst
    other things of a capital steam-engine, boiler, steam-pipes,
    shafting, gearing, and apparatus to the said erections and
    buildings respectively, and a certain way or passage granted,
    by the said Handle Taylor.
    The property is not subject to any chief rent; it is admirably adapted
    for carrying on an extensive trade in tile engraving
    or cotton-spinning business. There is a-plentiful supply,
    of water. The land unbuilt upon has a good frontage, and is
    well situate for building- upon.
     
     
    Notice is hereby given, that a building,
    named Church of the Annunciation, situated
    at New Mills, in the parish of Glossop, in the
    County of Derby in the district of Hayfield and
    Glossop, being a building licensed and used for
    public religious worship as a Roman Catholic
    Chapel exclusively, was, on the 6th day of November
    1844, duly registered for solemnizing
    marriages therein. 



    Executions in Derbyshire

    1556 August 1
    Joan Waste was burnt as a heretic in Windmill Pit, on the Burton Road, at
    Derby. (She was a blind woman, who, during the reign of Edward VI, had
    attended the services of the Church. After Queen Mary came to the throne she
    was accused before the Bishop of the Diocese of maintaining that the
    Sacrament was only a memorial or representation of the body of Christ, and
    the elements were mere bread and wine.
    This opinion she was required to renounce; but, persisting in it, she received sentence of condemnation. After a sermon in the church she was led to the stake on the Burton Road, and there burned, holding Roger Waste, her brother, by the hand, praying and desiring those around her to pray.

    1683 July 25
    Three Roman Catholic priests, Nicholas Garlick, Robert Ludlam, and Richard
    Sympson, suffered martyrdom at Derby, being hanged drawn and quartered.

    1608
    Five men and a woman executed at Tapton Bridge, Chesterfield, the Assizes
    having been held at Chesterfield owing to the prevalence of the plague at
    Derby.

    1665 March 14
    Woman pressed to death in the County of Derby, as a mute.
    (This awful punishment was pronounced on those who refused to plead and
    remained mute.
    Before the inflection of the sentence the accused was warned three times of
    the penalty which would attend obstinate silence, and allowed a short time
    for consideration.
    If the prisoner still persisted in silence, the Judgement of Penance, as it
    was termed, was thus pronounced: "That you be taken back to the prison
    whence you came to a low dungeon into which no light can enter; that you be
    laid on your back on the bare floor, with a cloth round your loins, but
    elsewhere naked; that there be set on your body a weight of iron, as great
    as you can bear - and greater; that you have no sustenance save, on the
    first day three morsels of the coarsest bread, on the second day three
    draughts of stagnant water from the pool nearest the prison door, on the
    third day again three morsels of bread as before, and such bread and such
    water alternately from day to day until you die".
    This is the last known instance of this awful penalty being carried into
    effect).

    1693
    Girl in farm service at Swanwick burnt for murdering her master.
    This was the last case in Derbyshire of death by burning at the stake.

    1732 March 23
    John Hewitt and Rosamund Ollerenshaw executed for poisoning Hannah Hewitt at
    Derby.
    (They were executed in their shrouds).

    1738 March 2
    Richard Woodward hanged at Derby for highway robbery.

    1757
    Thomas Hulley hanged for returning from transportation.

    1785 April 1
    William and George Grooby and James Peat, for burglary at Derby.
    ("It is now more than sixty years," says the Mercury, "since there were so
    many executed at one time upon our gallows; the persons who suffered then
    were named Rock, Lyon, and Shaw, and we believe their crime was
    counterfeiting the current coin of the realm. Peat wrote on the prison doors
    with chalk:
    'Calm and Composed,
    my soul a journey takes;
    No guilt that troubles,
    nor a heart that akes.)

    1788 March 29
    Thomas Grundy hanged for murdering his brother.
    (After execution his body was publicly dissected in the presence of a great
    number of spectators).

    1795 April 10
    Thomas Neville, for burglary.
    (He was carried to execution in a Mourning coach, attended by a hearse;
    where he assisted his executioner to fasten the rope to the tree, after
    which he drew his cap over his face and leapt from the cart into eternity)


    1803 March 19
    William Wells, for murder at Barlborough.
    (About a minute after he had been hanged the rope slipped and he fell to the
    ground; the executioner was therefore under the necessity of tying him up a
    second time. His body was given to the surgeons for dissection).

    1813 April 9
    Paul Mason, Richard Hibbert and Peter Henshaw, for burglary.
    (They were executed on the new drop, in front of the County Gaol, before an
    immense crowd of spectators).

    1815 March 8
    Anthony Lingard, for murder. The last case of gibbetting in the County of
    Derby.
    (The body was afterwards removed to Wardlow Miers, and hung in chains near
    to the house where the crime was perpetrated.
    This was the last case of gibbetting in the County of Derby. Lingard's
    brother William was 11 years later sentenced at Derby Assizes for highway
    robbery and assault, and was reprieved. William Lingard committed the
    robbery within view of the gibbett on which the bleaching bones of his
    brother were hanging)

    1817 August 15
    John Brown, Thomas Jackson, George Booth and John King, for arson at North
    Wingfield.
    (In describing the execution the "Derby Mercury" of that date says: "As
    every fact which may tend to illustrate the principles of human action
    deserves notice, it is worth observing that a heavy shower happening whilst
    the doomed men were singing the hymn, two of them deliberately retreated to
    the shelter of an umbrella which was expanded on the drop, and a third
    placed himself under cover of the doorway.
    The inconvenience of being wet was felt and avoided by men who knew they had
    not five minutes longer to live !!").

    1817 November 7
    Brandreth, Ludlam, and Turner, the "Pentrich Plotters", executed at Derby.
    The last instance of the old penalty of high treason, hanging, drawing and
    quartering.
    (Cavalry stood on guard during the execution. The prisoners were first
    dragged round the prison yard on hurdles, were then hanged for half an hour,
    and their bodies afterwards cut down.
    The executioner then struck the heads off the bodies and seizing the head of
    Brandreth by the hair, showed the ghastly countenance to the multitude,
    exclaiming: "Behold the head of the traitor, Jeremiah Brandreth.
    The crowd, "as if under the impulse of a sudden frenzy," separated in all
    directions, but equanimity was restored, "and the separation and exhibition
    of the remaining heads was witnessed with the greatest order and decorum".
    The executioners were masked and their names were kept a profound secret.
    The poet Shelley witnessed the scene.
    The block is still to be seen in Derby Prison, where its wood hangs damp
    always damp - so it has been averred - it has given rise to the tradition
    that the block of the unhappy men has not dried and never will).

    1819 March 22
    Hannah Docking (aged 16), for poisoning another little girl.

    1847 April 1
    John Platts, for murder at Chesterfield.
    (This was a public execution in front of the County Gaol, and was witnessed
    by 20,000 people).

    1862 April 11
    Richard Thorley, for the murder of Eliza Morrow.
    (The last public execution in Derby).

    1881 November 21
    Alfred Gough, for the murder of Eleanor Windley aged six, at Brimington.

    1888 August 10
    Arthur Thomas Delaney, for the murder of his wife at Chesterfield.

    1902 July 30
    John Bedford, for the murder of Nacy Price at Duckmanton.

    1905 December 29
    John Silk, for the murder of his mother at Chesterfield.

    1812 New Mills Old Prize Band was formed in 1812, by Timothy Beard, Choirmaster of the Brookbottom Methodist Chapel. Generations of the Beard family were prominent figures at New Mills Old Prize Band for over a century.

    1900 Band Leader Stephen Beard composed a tune called "Ransom". It may have been a rearrangment of the methodist hymn 'Thou Sheperd of Israel, and Mine', by Charles Wesley. The tune was known and loved throughout the district and played on request at many gatherings. it became in many ways the anthem of the town. Referred to as a lovely broad flowing melody that many of the towns people had known since childhood.